You are at:

  1. Home »
  2. Topic »
  3. Highways »
  4. Junction design »
  5. Visibility splays

visibility splays

Filter content

Filter by attributes
Filter by date

Documents

Title Document type Published Publisher
Traffic Management Techniques for Cyclists: Final Report

Read document description

This report focuses on a project undertaken for the Department for Transport (Traffic Management Division) in March 2011 entitled Investigation of Options for Traffic Management Techniques for Cyclists at Signallised Junctions in the Urban Environment. It describes the outcome of a desktop study that investigates the techniques that are in common usage both in the UK and overseas for cyclist provision at traffic signals.

Research 24/09/12 Department for Transport Add icon
Manual for Streets 2: Wider Application of the Principles

Read document description

Streets and roads make up around three-quarters of all public space – their design, appearance, and the way they function have a huge impact on the quality of people’s lives. Manual for Streets 2 - Wider Application of the Principles is the result of collaborative working between the Department for Transport and the transportation industry. It is an excellent demonstration of what can be achieved when Government works in partnership with professional industry representatives. The aim of the document is to extend the advantages of good design to streets and roads outside residential areas and to provide an environment that improves the quality of life. By rethinking the way high streets and non-trunk roads are designed, the fabric of public spaces and the way people behave can be changed. It means embracing a new approach to design and breaking away from inflexible standards and traditional engineering solutions. The new guide does not supersede Manual for Streets; rather it explains how the principles of the first document can be applied more widely. The guide further integrates the fundamentals of “Link and Place”, allowing designers to set the right design strategy for the particular nuances of busier streets. It also outlines a process to deliver the Governments new de-cluttering agenda. The flexible and pragmatic guidance will assist all professionals involved in regeneration, development and highway management with a toolkit of approaches and methods that address the challenges on our busier streets.

Secondary Doc. 29/09/10 CIHT Add icon
Research for MfS2 High Risk Collision Sites and Y Distance Visibility

Read document description

The approach to visibility at priority junctions has been to provide a minimum stopping sight distance value (SSD) appropriate to a particular design speed, for example 70m SSD for 50kph. The assumption made by some designers and road safety auditors is that this value provides a minimum road safety requirement, and that collision risk will increase if the SSD is not achieved. The purpose of this research was to examine whether a direct relationship can be established between variations in Y distance SSD and collision frequency at priority junctions.

Research 29/09/10 CIHT Add icon
Designing Streets: A Policy Statement for Scotland

Read document description

Designing Streets is the first policy statement in Scotland for street design and marks a change in the emphasis of guidance on street design towards place-making and away from a system focused upon the dominance of motor vehicles. It has been created to support the Scottish Government’s place-making agenda and is intended to sit alongside the 2001 planning policy document Designing Places, which sets out government aspirations for design and the role of the planning system in delivering these.

Primary Doc. 02/03/10 Scottish Executive Add icon
Design Guide & Specification - Residential and Industrial Estates Development

Read document description

This document was identified as part of the UKRLG Project on Design & Maintenance Guidance. Hartlepool's design guide for developers, who will seek for the highways constructed to be adopted under section 38 or 278 of the Highways Act.

Secondary Doc. 01/02/10 UK Roads Liaison Group Add icon
Engineer's Design And Reference Tool

Read document description

The e-dart (Engineer's Design And Reference Tool) website has been developed to improve access to local authority road design guidelines and standards for development. Specifically aimed at Transport Planner's, the site provides access to design standard for local authorities throughout the UK, with a user friendly search facility to allow the identification of the appropriate information. The site also allows users to create outputs for future reference.

Useful Website 01/01/09 CIHT Add icon
LTN 03/08 Mixed Priority Routes: Practitioners' Guide

Read document description

In 2000,1 the Department for the Environment, Transport and the Regions (now the Department for Transport, DfT) published its strategy for road safety in Tomorrows Roads Safer for Everyone. In this document Mixed Priority Routes were identified as being among the least safe of urban roads. Subsequently, the DfT invited local highway authorities to submit schemes for inclusion in the Mixed Priority Routes (MPR) Road Safety Demonstration Project where DfT grants of up to £1 million were available for each participating authority. The ten schemes selected to be included in the project covered a spectrum of different types of authority and highway characteristics. This document reviews the experience from the ten schemes involved in the Demonstration Project and presents the lessons learned through the project to assist practitioners develop similar successful schemes. This report provides guidance for project managers and senior technical staff who might be involved in the development and delivery of MPR schemes, building on the experience of those that have already been through the process and understand the organisation and delivery issues involved. The MPR schemes have unique technical solutions to the redesign of their streets. It is not the purpose of this document to set out technical solutions. A brochure entitled High Street Renaissance and detailed scheme reports are also published on the DfT website, www.dft.org.uk. Summary Mixed Priority Routes are streets that carry high levels of traffic and also have: a mix of residential use and commercial frontages; a mix of road users, i.e. shoppers, cyclists, bus passengers, schoolchildren; a mix of parking and deliveries; They are not just transport routes. Although dealing with transport and safety is a key element, other concerns associated with the local economy and local communities may also generate an interest in improving the area with economic regeneration and environmental improvements. There are many benefits to be gained from enhancing the high street environment with an integrated approach. The investment is likely to contribute towards assisting the delivery of a range of local authority corporate objectives and targets including: accessibility planning; accident reduction; economic regeneration; Public Service Agreement; quality of life; and sustainability.

Primary Doc. 01/10/08 Department for Transport Add icon
Manual for Streets

Read document description

There is a need to transform the quality of residential streets, and this requires a new approach to their provision. The Manual is aimed at any organisation or discipline with an interest in residential streets, ranging from access officers to the emergency services. The importance of joint working among practitioners is a key feature of the Manual. Its scope is limited to residential and other lightly trafficked streets, although some of its principles may be applied to other road types where appropriate. It is not, however, meant to be used for trunk routes of any description, as these roads are covered by the Highways Agency’s Design Manual for Roads and Bridges. Streets should not be designed just to accommodate the movement of motor vehicles - a prime consideration is that they meet the needs of pedestrians and cyclists.

Primary Doc. 29/03/07 Department for Transport Add icon
Know Your Traffic Signs

Read document description

Why know your traffic signs? Traffic signs play a vital role in directing, informing and controllingroad users' behaviour in an effort to make the roads as safe aspossible for everyone. This makes a knowledge of traffic signsessential. Not just for new drivers or riders needing to pass theirtheory test, but for all road users, including experiencedprofessional drivers. Keeping up to date We live in times of change. Society, technology and the economy allplay their part in changing the way we travel. New road signsconveying new messages and in new formats are introduced fromtime to time, so drivers or riders who passed their driving test a fewyears ago need to keep up to date or run the risk of failing tounderstand or comply with recently introduced signs. A few examples of events that called for new signs include: • Britain's first motorway • Pelican crossings • Reintroduction of trams • Advanced stop lines • Vehicle-activated signs • Active Traffic Management. Responsibility for traffic signsResponsibility for the road network in the UK is split among:• the Highways Agency in England• the Welsh Assembly Government in Wales• the Scottish Executive in Scotland• and local or regional highway authorities. The central administrations above are responsible for the UK’sstrategic road network. Strategic roads are the highways that linkcities, areas of population, ports and airports. Most motorways andsome “A” roads are strategic roads. Local or regional highway authorities are responsible for localroads, and this includes a few motorways, all other “A” roads andall other public roads. While responsibility for placing, erecting andmaintaining traffic signs is split among these bodies, it is importantthat signs are consistent both in appearance and in the way theyare used.To ensure that the UK has a uniform traffic signing system, signsmust conform to the designs prescribed in the Traffic SignsRegulations and General Directions (although some signs mayhave been specially authorised by the Secretary of State). The Traffic Signs Manual, published by TSO, provides detailedguidance for those responsible for designing and installing traffic signs.

Secondary Doc. 01/01/07 Department for Transport Add icon
Mini Roundabouts - Good Practice Guidance

Read document description

This document seeks to help practitioners understand what a mini-roundabout is and how it should be used. It explains the legislative basis for mini-roundabouts and establishes current practice based upon real examples of installation and lessons learned. This document does not explain how a miniroundabout should be designed; see section 1.4 for further information. The intention is to examine mini-roundabouts in terms of their current use, as a traffic engineering tool. The road markings for a mini-roundabout and related signs are prescribed in the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002 (TSRGD). Detailed guidance on the correct use of these signs and markings can be found in Chapters 3 and 5 of the Traffic Signs Manual.

Primary Doc. 27/11/06 Department for Transport Add icon
Showing results 1-10 of 14
  • 1
  • 2